Recipes

Recipes Featuring Carrots

Recipes

These are historical recipes that we have not put much attention to recently. As time progresses, look for more farm centered recipes or check our recipes on our YouTube channel. We are slowly building them out at that location.

Adas bil Hamod (Lebanese Lentil Lemon Soup)
Albondigas Soup
Asian Style Healing Power Puree of Greens Soup
Asian Style Saute
Asparagus and Ricotta Phyllo Tart
Avocado Enchilada Filling
Baby Greens with Warm Gorgonzola Dressing
Baked Eggs with Collards and Cheddar Garlic Grits
Baked Potatoes Topped with Spicy Vegetable Stew
Baked Squash
Baked Squash Gratin
Baked Zucchini
Baked Zucchini Au Gratin
Balsamic Potato Salad with Summer Herbs
Balsamic Vinaigrette
Barley and Kale Gratin
Basic Italian Dressing
Beet-Top Crustless Quiche
Beets and Pasta
Black-eyed Pea and Sorrel Stew
Braised Lemon Swiss Chard
Braised Mixed Greens with Fresh Peas
Butternut Squash and Apple Bisque
Carrot and Daikon Salad
Carrot Muffins
Celery Salad
Chard Soup with Cream Cheese “Croutons”
Chicken and Strawberry Salad
Chicken Teriyaki over Stir-Fried Vegetables
Chicken with Fresh Basil and Peppers
Chicken, Pasta, and Vegetable Cold Salad
Choose Your Own Adventure Potato Salad
Cilantro, Caper, and Lime Dressing
Collard Greens with Almonds
Colorful Arugula Salad
Coucous with Chickpeas, Tomatoes, and Edamame
Creamy Swiss Chard with Red Kidney Beans
Curried Rice Patties with Tahini Dressing
Extra Beet Surprise
Fire Cider
Fish Tacos
Fresh Greens with Garlic and Oregano
Fried Garlic Scapes
Fried Rice with Bok Choy
Garlic Cucumber Sauce
Garlic Roasted Chicken Breast
Garlic Scape Pesto
Garlicky Brussels Sprouts Saute
Garlicky Green Beans
Ginger Dressing
Greek Baked Zucchini
Green Bean and Mint Salad
Green Eggs (and ham)
Grilled Potato and Carrot Salad
Hot and Sour Soup with Swiss Chard
Hot Marinated Cauliflower
Indian-Spiced Kale and Chickpeas
Jack’s “Very Versatile” Homemade Salad Dressing
Kale and Potato Tarragon Salad
Kale Meal
Kale Soup
Kichidi
Lacto-Fermented Pickles
Leeks Vinaigrette
Lima Bean and Greens Casserole
Litchfield Small Slaw
Manhattan Clam Chowder
Marinated Cucumbers and Tomatoes
Mexican Potato Omelet
Micah’s Chard Pie
Minted Snap Peas
Mustard Greens with Corn, Leeks, and Bacon
Mustard Vinaigrette
October Stir-Fry
Oregano Baked Onions
Oven Fried Zucchini Spears
Pasta with Dark Greens
Peanut Butter Balls
Peppered Pork and Pears
Pesto
Pig Foot Soup to Die For
Poached Eggs in Cilantro Parsley Butter
Pork, Kale, and Bok Choy Stir-Fry
Portuguese Kale Soup
Potato Wedges with Oregano-Garlic Butter
Quiche Crust
Quick Creamed Spinach
Quick Half-Sour Pickles
Rhubarb Sauce
Rick’s Tacos with Garlicky Mexican Greens
Rigatoni wth Pumpkin and Bacon
Roasted Beet Salad
Roasted Glazed Parsnips and Carrots with Orange and Thyme
Roasted Sweet Potatoes and Peas
Roasted Tomato Sauce
Roasted Vegetables
Sauteed Kale with Balsamic Vinaigrette
Scallion Dressing
Seven O’Clock Cucumber Salad
Soy Ginger Dressing
Spaghetti Squash Bake
Spanakopita
Spanish Greens
Special Indian Tomato Sauce
Spinach and Garlic Scape Frittata
Spinach Rice
Spinach Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Spring Greens Salad with Dressing Variations
Spring Turnips with Greens and Raisins
Springtime Pesto
Steamed Asian Greens with Honey Soy Sesame Dressing
Steamed Chard w/ Balsamic Vinegar and Honey
Steamed Greens and Gomasio
Steamed Greens with Lemon and Garlic
Steamed Hot and Sour Hearts of Bok Choy
Stuffed Cabbage Casserole
Sugar Snap Pea Salad with Lemon Mint Vinaigrette
Summer Squash Frittata
Super Simple Savory Chard
Tabouleh with Mint and Pistachios
Tangerine Kale
Tex-Mex Soft Vegetable Tacos
Tomato Potatoes
Tomatoes with Feta and Oregano
Turnip Greens
Two Way Street Beets
Vegetable Lasagna
Warming Winter White Bean and Kale Soup
White Bean and Collard Soup
White Bean and Greens Soup
Winter Squash Bread
Yummy Vegetable Pie
Zucchini Basil Tart
Zucchini Lasagna

Albondigas Soup

Big Dog

Halloween

No Newsletter next week. Jack and I are attending a Celebration of Life in MD over the week end. Julie

Big Dog

That is what Chuk calls him. I prefer to think of him as a gentle giant. Either way, Jonathan Anderson has been a wonderful addition to the MHOF staff. We met years ago when Jonathan became a meat bird customer and we also stayed in touch through NOFA. When Jonathan baled from corporate America, we started seeing him a lot at our winter/spring workshops we ran in 2020 and in February I received a short email. “Is that job still open?” “Yes, I said, are you interested?” He gave us a call and Jack and I hired him on the spot.

Jonathan’s magnum opus at the farm this year has been the garage project. For 40 years I averted my eyes from the brown stained oriented strand board siding, and over the past 2-3 years the side door started to hang on its hinges and the roof was in bad need of a refreshing. Under Chuk’s careful eye (“you can only have a credit card’s width between the boards of the siding”) and with weekly help from Stu and John, Jonathan has transformed the garage into a spiffy-looking building that could only be described as a major attraction these days. 5 more boards on the exterior still remain, but the rehab, complete with a fancy pull down door to the attic, a new side door, and some fancy windows, not to mention the state-of-the-art brooder house in the back, has turned the first building that Jack and I put up in the summer of 1982 into a fine part of the ambiance here.

So, he is a careful and thorough carpenter, but he fixes everything that breaks, and in record time. And systems, he is a systems guy! Both of our back pack sprayers were running all summer because Jonathan stayed on top of their maintenance, only calling Dave when needed for repairs. And now Jonathan and Jack are organizing the shed, a project which got started in 2002 when Leo was here, but never got finished.

Jonathan and I often have thoughtful conversations early in the morning before the others arrive, and share our latest findings in physical, emotional and spiritual health.

Jonathan is always calm. He has taken on management of the Stetson kids on Mondays and they love doing ‘He-Man’ stuff like moving pigs and splitting wood with him as their quiet but attentive boss for the morning.

And he is so reliable and of high moral fiber – a great teammate for me and Clare as we work our way through our intricate list of tasks each week in order to make the farm highly functional. We are blessed. Thank you, Jonathan!

Jonathan with the Stetson Staff

Always smiling

Health Resources

Podcasts

I really enjoyed this podcast regarding resources for transforming autism. Worth a listen.

And here is a good one regarding parasites.

Recipes

Stuffed Carnival Squash with Sausage and Apples

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Ingredients:

  • 3 medium sized carnival squash (or other winter squash)
  • 1 large onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 lbs ground pork sausage
  • 2 small apples, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups kale, rinsed and chopped
  • 2 Tbs fresh (or 2 tsp dried) sage, chopped
  • Salt (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Cut squash in half vertically with a serrated knife and remove the stem area. Scoop seeds and pulp from each half with a spoon. Reserve seeds for another use.
  3. Place squash halved open side up on a baking sheet. Bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is tender. Remove from oven and allow to cool while you work on the next step.
  4. Cook sausage in a large skillet over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, or until about halfway cooked. Add onions and garlic. Continue to cook until fully browned. Add apples, kale and herbs. Continue to cook until apples soften and kale is wilted, about 2 more minutes. Taste and add salt if desired.
  5. Add cooked sausage mixture to cooked squash halves, heaping the mixture a bit but not overflowing the cavities. Bake for 10 minutes, or until top is slightly browned. (You could also broil them at this stage if your like an extra crispy layer.)
  6. Remove from oven and allow to cool before serving. The skin of the carnival squash is tougher than many other winter squashes, so it can be composted after the inside of the meal has been devoured.

Download Recipe

CSA Updates This Week

CSA Crops This Week

This is the first week of the fall CSA

  • Parsley – beautiful frost one morning last week
  • Chard – despite several frosts, this chard looks stellar!
  • Carrots
  • Beet(s)
  • Cilantro
  • Hakurei turnips
  • Arugula
  • Garlic
  • Bok choi or Chinese cabbage or tatsoi
  • Bartlett pears
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Leeks
  • Butternut squash

Bring Back Your Share Bags

Please save us lots of money and bring back your share bags. You can drop them at your pick-up site over the next two weeks or so. We will collect them, launder them, fix them, and reuse them next year. Thanks for attending to this.

Join the 2023 Summer Share Early

Not sure if we will raise the price for the shares next year, but between now and December 31 you can pay 2022 prices. This keeps us in good cash flow as we go into the winter. You can follow this link – https://mhof.net/csa-share-options/

Reserve a 2023 Summer CSA Share

MHOF Meat

Meat birds available for sale

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

The chickens are now in the freezer, so call or email to come buy some – https://mhof.net/organic-meat/.

Old layers available October 30 (sorry about last week’s typo)

These old gals make a phenomenal chicken stock and the price is right – just $15. We slaughtered on October 30 and now have them available in the freezer.

MHOF Meat

Now is a good time to order your Thanksgiving turkey

They are going fast! There are now only 14 birds left. The birds are out there growing like weeds on our luscious pasture, certified organic feed and a regular treat of comfrey. Our turkeys are renowned as the tastiest and juiciest birds that will ever grace your Thanksgiving table. Birds are slaughtered the Monday before Thanksgiving (November 21) and are available for pick up on Tuesday, the 22nd from 1-6 pm and Wednesday, the 23rd from 8am – noon.

Zoey, Danny and Paula’s granddaughter, was over helping with turkey chores this past weekend

Limited supply of lard available now


We have some of our 2022 lard available. It won’t be ready again until early 2023. Still $20/quart. Stop by after checking in for a time, or order it online and we will ship.

MHOF Pork and Lard

Working Shareholders Always Welcome

Yes, you can still add yourself to the MHOF workforce. Come any M, W or F from 8-12 and stay for lunch. We always have a great time. Solange from Rwanda was our guest last Thursday. What a treat!

Volunteer at MHOF

Farm Doin’s

October has been a beautiful month. It might be my most favorite time of year. We still have plenty to do, but we can stop to “smell the roses” a bit. There is so much beautiful produce growing, the trees are unburdening themselves daily, and the increasing frosts let us know that soon our work in the fields will slow down significantly.

This week we moved the pigs again, to another part of the west field to add their rooting skills and manure to the garden beds that are finished. Jonathan and crew got so close on the garage siding, we gathered and dried some mugwort to make tincture, made a final harvest of apples, finished up our pear sauce, cleaned out the seed freezer and organized it, made some repairs to the tractor and the sprayers, continued foliar feeding the remaining field crops, made real progress on the shed organization, harvested and distributed the final week of the summer CSA and got right onto the fall share prep with labels, bags, letters to shareholders, etc.

Luke MacLean stopped by to audition for a job next spring (and we hired him). On Thursday, Renee brought her UMASS vegetable class to the farm to learn and work and we accomplished the planting of the garlic in 45 minutes!

Luke

Jonathan and Leslie with Wednesday’s CSA pick

UMass students helping plant garlic

Stetson kids doing some wood splitting

Julie

Quick Links

Buy CSA
Buy meat
CSA pick up information
Contact Julie
Products available right now at the farm
Become a working shareholder

Farm Dog

Not too long ago every farm had a farm dog, if not two or three. They, like a barnful of cats, were assumed to be a critical part of the farm workforce. Call us old fashioned, but we still hold by this tenet that we need to have these farmworkers/pets in order to be successful raising not only birds on pasture, but fruit trees, and vegetables.

Skippy is the spotlight of this story today. Alex, our incredible working shareholder from Brazil, happens to be a most amazing photographer, and he is happiest when he is taking pictures. He is also very good with a knife when we are preserving lots of greens!

Skippy came to us from farm dog parents. I remember the day in the pond field in February of 2021 when Clare offhandedly noted that her friend Abby was going to have some puppies available. “What?! Will you put me in touch with her immediately so we can get one?” I reminded her three times that day that I wanted that introduction, which she made. And Skippy came to us on April 5 last year, having been raised by her dog mother and her human mother just like I would have dreamed for our soon to replace Franny dream dog.

Franny did train her up to always be with us, to help move birds and pigs, and to dig for mice and voles at all times in the field. Franny was good about not barking at folks, which Skippy has not yet worked out, but Franny did like to take off, and thankfully Skippy stays right here on the farm all the time. When she is in the house, she steals a little couch time after wolfing down her organic dog food, egg, cod liver oil, pork stock and chicken head breakfast, but soon she is back outside. And at night, she and Dingo bark more or less, depending on how many carnivorous predators are lurking around the birds.

We are so lucky to have Skippy (as is Dingo, our timid rescue guy). Here she is fresh from her photo shoot this past Thursday.

Keeping the turkeys moving as we do our part
Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

Attentive as we move some birds into another house to spread them out
Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

At rest after the work is done
Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

And thanks again, Alex!

Farm Videos

Planting in the greenhouse

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Marathon food preservation

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Freezing some peppers

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Here we are putting on remay – the crops made it through fine, by the way

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Book Review

All Creatures Great and Small

James Herriot

I grew up on a hog farm in Illinois and my dad was a country vet. He was 5 years younger than Herriot and was living a somewhat parallel life with this famous Scottish vet who spent his entire adult life in the Dales in England. So, this book and the many that followed have very special meaning to me, because I know what a retained placenta is, and remember having to answer all phone calls and get important messages to my dad. And I went along on a few calf pullings, and looked in awe when my dad would put his entire arm in the cow’s rectum.

You may not have such a visceral response to this incredible writing, but you will be drawn in by Herriot’s ability to tell a story, take you to a place, help you get to know people, and warm your heart while making you laugh out loud. There is a reason why these books are worldwide best sellers. If you haven’t partaken, I suggest that you do. And if you read them 30 years ago like I did, it is worth picking them up again.

CSA Updates This Week

CSA Crops This Week

This is the final week of the summer CSA!

Tomatoes and other farm gleanings may appear in your share this week. Plus:

  • Parsley
  • Chard
  • Carrots
  • Beet(s)
  • Kale
  • Cilantro
  • Arugula
  • Potatoes
  • Garlic
  • Bok choi or Chinese cabbage
  • Bartlett pears

Eight of those crates later, this ‘giving tree’ only produced around 1000 pears this year due to the drought, but she still did an amazing job

End of Season Survey

Watch for this and fill it out please. We value your feedback.

Bring Back Your Share Bags

Please save us lots of money and bring back your share bags. You can drop them at your pick-up site over the next two weeks or so. We will collect them, launder them, fix them, and reuse them next year. You can plan ahead and bring your bags to your site this week for your last pick up. And when you get there to pick up your share, bring another bag to transfer the produce into. Leave your share bag behind and it will then be off your mind and into our hands. Thanks for attending to this.

Join the 2023 Summer Share Early

You can join the summer CSA for 2023 from now until December 31 and pay 2022 prices. We get a needed cash flush as we are paying dearly for turkey, pig and chicken feed right now. Soon we will be purchasing fertility liquids from AEA, a 22 -ton load of rock dust and hopefully some tractor trailer loads of wood chips from the town.  You can join here.

Reserve a 2023 Summer CSA Share

Letters From Subscribers

Hi Julie

I have to introduce myself – my name is Cari. I am a friend of Jonathon’s and I live in Adelaide South Australia. I met Jonathon through Farmers Footprint and we stayed chatting over the last year or more. I have loved hearing his journey with you and when I subscribed to your newsletter I just had to respond today – theres not many I read through but I ADORE your humour and pics and knowledge and it’s just such a great read.

Your subscribers and CSA members just get so nourished by your food and words and love.

Today’s highlight was your chilling out over picking the hemp and ‘still’ chilling out as it dried.

Gosh I giggled, anyway much love to you all for the amazing work you do and for the joy and hearty goodness you bring my heart walks with yours,

CARI

Gosh, Cari, 

This is so kind, and all the way from Australia! I am humbled that our newsletter strikes a chord with you. It seems to just regurgitate all over the page after just hanging out inside somewhere all these years. Best to you in your life journey. 🙂Julie

Dear Julie,

As a woman of similar vintage, I so resonated with your thoughts about cleaning!

Wish we were still closer and able to feast on all your wonderful foods.

Warmly,

Sue

Thanks, Sue, I cleaned the main floor of the house that week, and then slipped back into my slovenly ways, although we have been averaging one thorough sweep of the kitchen each day. Small steps! 

Of course, you can always stop down and load up on our meat for the year. We would love to see you and Tom again. 

Here’s to just the right attitude toward house cleaning!

Be well, Julie

Dear Julie and Jack,

I share your enthusiasm about eating with your loved ones and even a few who are borderline. It’s good for them.

I have always tried to do that, although it has not always been possible when family members were away for many varied reasons.

I read about tulsi tea in your latest email and it sounds quite beneficial. I’ll see if it’s available here. I’d like to try it.

Love, Ella

Thanks as always, Ella, for your regular missives. Yes, find that tea. I think you will enjoy it immensely. 

We certainly come from a culture of feeding others – the rich farm tradition of putting on an extra plate. I am so glad to have all our Western Wyoming blood running in my veins. And then add it to the Iowa Rawson traditions and you could say that I am just following my deep-seated instincts. 

Love, Julie

Julie,

This is a great explanation of stages of plant health. It made me think of what you have modeled. I thought you would like the piece if not already in their orbit.

http://www.theconsciousfarmer.com/plant-health-sugar-levels/

Thanks for pointing us toward the light!

R

Hi Renee, 

Thanks for sending this. I enjoyed the article. As we are right now in the frost realm, we are still spraying our remaining crops each week to see how we can dodge the frost as long as possible. We were happy to make it through last night with no damage to the Swiss chard, which we thought was for sure a goner. I think it is important to keep the management protocols going until the very end. We certainly have seen a lot more frost resistance improvement as the years have gone by. 

Julie

For Sale

French door refrigerator ( LMX25964**)

In good condition
Bottom freezer drawer is stuck otherwise works great
Up pick up $500 at Warwick/orange line
For more details call Shawnee at 978-355-2731

Fall CSA Share

Fall Share – sign up now

We still have room! We can take up to 100 fall shares and we have 76 in hand as we speak, so there is still room. We will be picking on Mondays for Gardner, Athol, Princeton, Holden and Barre. Wednesday pick up for Barre, Sutton, Worcester and Shrewsbury.  Our start on October 31. For the last week, all pick-ups will be on Monday, November 21. You can join here:

Reserve a Fall Share

Here are some of the beautiful greens you can expect with the fall share:

MHOF Meat

Meat birds available for sale

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

The chickens are now in the freezer, so call or email to come buy some – https://mhof.net/organic-meat/.

Old Layers Available November 30

These old gals make a phenomenal chicken stock and the price is right – just $15. We slaughter on November 30 and will have them available for sale that day from 1-4 pm. No giblets. You can order them here:

MHOF Meat

Now is a good time to order your Thanksgiving turkey

They are going fast! There are now only 24 birds left. The birds are out there growing like weeds on our luscious pasture, certified organic feed and a regular treat of comfrey. Our turkeys are renowned as the tastiest and juiciest birds that will ever grace your Thanksgiving table. Birds are slaughtered the Monday before Thanksgiving (November 21) and are available for pick up on Tuesday, the 22nd from 1-6 pm and Wednesday, the 23rd from 8am – noon.

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

Limited supply of lard available now


We have some of our 2022 lard available. It won’t be ready again until early 2023. Still $20/quart. Stop by after checking in for a time, or order it online and we will ship.

MHOF Pork

Working Shareholders Always Welcome

Yes, you can still add yourself to the MHOF workforce. Come any M, W or F from 8-12 and stay for lunch. We always have a great time. Solange from Rwanda was our guest last Thursday. What a treat!

Making rows for garlic planting this upcoming Tuesday

Volunteer at MHOF

Farm Doin’s

It has been a busy, but increasingly chilled out two weeks since we spoke last. The frost came and came and came and came, but no new crops have been lost after the initial killing of tulsi, squash and tomatoes. We have been preserving, working on the garage, prepping for garlic planting, cleaning up our fertility supplies and storing, moving all of our stored produce from the barn to the root cellar and basement living room. October is a beautiful month. The leaves are really falling now and soon we will be putting those aside…

Skippy and Dingo hunting for voles (they have been taking out parsley roots) under the mulch

Julie

Quick Links

Buy CSA
Buy meat
CSA pick up information
Contact Julie
Products available right now at the farm
Become a working shareholder