Recipes

Recipes Featuring Carrots

Recipes

These are historical recipes that we have not put much attention to recently. As time progresses, look for more farm centered recipes or check our recipes on our YouTube channel. We are slowly building them out at that location.

Adas bil Hamod (Lebanese Lentil Lemon Soup)
Albondigas Soup
Asian Style Healing Power Puree of Greens Soup
Asian Style Saute
Asparagus and Ricotta Phyllo Tart
Avocado Enchilada Filling
Baby Greens with Warm Gorgonzola Dressing
Baked Eggs with Collards and Cheddar Garlic Grits
Baked Potatoes Topped with Spicy Vegetable Stew
Baked Squash
Baked Squash Gratin
Baked Zucchini
Baked Zucchini Au Gratin
Balsamic Potato Salad with Summer Herbs
Balsamic Vinaigrette
Barley and Kale Gratin
Basic Italian Dressing
Beet-Top Crustless Quiche
Beets and Pasta
Black-eyed Pea and Sorrel Stew
Braised Lemon Swiss Chard
Braised Mixed Greens with Fresh Peas
Butternut Squash and Apple Bisque
Carrot and Daikon Salad
Carrot Muffins
Celery Salad
Chard Soup with Cream Cheese “Croutons”
Chicken and Strawberry Salad
Chicken Teriyaki over Stir-Fried Vegetables
Chicken with Fresh Basil and Peppers
Chicken, Pasta, and Vegetable Cold Salad
Choose Your Own Adventure Potato Salad
Cilantro, Caper, and Lime Dressing
Collard Greens with Almonds
Colorful Arugula Salad
Coucous with Chickpeas, Tomatoes, and Edamame
Creamy Swiss Chard with Red Kidney Beans
Curried Rice Patties with Tahini Dressing
Extra Beet Surprise
Fire Cider
Fish Tacos
Fresh Greens with Garlic and Oregano
Fried Garlic Scapes
Fried Rice with Bok Choy
Garlic Cucumber Sauce
Garlic Roasted Chicken Breast
Garlic Scape Pesto
Garlicky Brussels Sprouts Saute
Garlicky Green Beans
Ginger Dressing
Greek Baked Zucchini
Green Bean and Mint Salad
Green Eggs (and ham)
Grilled Potato and Carrot Salad
Hot and Sour Soup with Swiss Chard
Hot Marinated Cauliflower
Indian-Spiced Kale and Chickpeas
Jack’s “Very Versatile” Homemade Salad Dressing
Kale and Potato Tarragon Salad
Kale Meal
Kale Soup
Kichidi
Lacto-Fermented Pickles
Leeks Vinaigrette
Lima Bean and Greens Casserole
Litchfield Small Slaw
Manhattan Clam Chowder
Marinated Cucumbers and Tomatoes
Mexican Potato Omelet
Micah’s Chard Pie
Minted Snap Peas
Mustard Greens with Corn, Leeks, and Bacon
Mustard Vinaigrette
October Stir-Fry
Oregano Baked Onions
Oven Fried Zucchini Spears
Pasta with Dark Greens
Peanut Butter Balls
Peppered Pork and Pears
Pesto
Pig Foot Soup to Die For
Poached Eggs in Cilantro Parsley Butter
Pork, Kale, and Bok Choy Stir-Fry
Portuguese Kale Soup
Potato Wedges with Oregano-Garlic Butter
Quiche Crust
Quick Creamed Spinach
Quick Half-Sour Pickles
Rhubarb Sauce
Rick’s Tacos with Garlicky Mexican Greens
Rigatoni wth Pumpkin and Bacon
Roasted Beet Salad
Roasted Glazed Parsnips and Carrots with Orange and Thyme
Roasted Sweet Potatoes and Peas
Roasted Tomato Sauce
Roasted Vegetables
Sauteed Kale with Balsamic Vinaigrette
Scallion Dressing
Seven O’Clock Cucumber Salad
Soy Ginger Dressing
Spaghetti Squash Bake
Spanakopita
Spanish Greens
Special Indian Tomato Sauce
Spinach and Garlic Scape Frittata
Spinach Rice
Spinach Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Spring Greens Salad with Dressing Variations
Spring Turnips with Greens and Raisins
Springtime Pesto
Steamed Asian Greens with Honey Soy Sesame Dressing
Steamed Chard w/ Balsamic Vinegar and Honey
Steamed Greens and Gomasio
Steamed Greens with Lemon and Garlic
Steamed Hot and Sour Hearts of Bok Choy
Stuffed Cabbage Casserole
Sugar Snap Pea Salad with Lemon Mint Vinaigrette
Summer Squash Frittata
Super Simple Savory Chard
Tabouleh with Mint and Pistachios
Tangerine Kale
Tex-Mex Soft Vegetable Tacos
Tomato Potatoes
Tomatoes with Feta and Oregano
Turnip Greens
Two Way Street Beets
Vegetable Lasagna
Warming Winter White Bean and Kale Soup
White Bean and Collard Soup
White Bean and Greens Soup
Winter Squash Bread
Yummy Vegetable Pie
Zucchini Basil Tart
Zucchini Lasagna

How you imagine the world determines how you live in it

Yes, we are running the CSA on Monday, Indigenous Peoples’ Day, October 10. And, no newsletter next week. Jack and I are heading to visit son Paul and family in MD.

“How you imagine the world determines how you live in it.” — David Suzuki

Agriculturally speaking, I think this is a really important thought to consider. My friend Ruben was over this weekend doing infiltration testing for a compaction grant that our farm is a part of, and we got on the subject of jumping worms. They are all the rage, it seems, as in, “oh no, another invasive that we have to get rid of.” Actually, they are mostly referred to as invasive jumping worms, or invasive Asian jumping worms. They wriggle when you uncover them, as opposed to the older “invasive” European worms that have been here since the Europeans brought them over. As I understand it, those European earthworms are considered beneficial, as normal as apple pie and baseball. “But these jumping worms eat up all the organic matter,” protest their detractors. My thought on that one is, “well, let’s add more organic matter for them to break down, because the worm castings that they leave actually feed the soil quite nicely (as is the case with European earthworm castings also).

The fact is that they are here. And I suspect that they are filling an ecological niche. We could go around and try to destroy them, or we could imagine that they are part of our agricultural evolution at this time in history and are here to teach us how to be better, more carbon-sequestering farmers. What I have observed on our farm is that in the places where we see these athletic worms when we pull the mulch aside, we also see some of our healthiest plants.

Ruben put it so nicely when he suggested that we not fear nature and natural processes, but learn what nature has to teach us about how to build a fantastically fertile soil. I walked away from our conversation so enlivened about the possibilities. I guess that my imagination on this topic is right where I would like it to be. Now all I have to work on is imagining the best regarding all of the human beings that I interact with each day!

Of Birthdays and Desserts

As I watched these two videos of, first Doodle’s birthday, and then Leslie’s (with the sound off), I was struck at the facials they made. Isn’t it wonderful when folks can focus in and make over us, if just for the span of a couple of minutes?

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

So, first a chocolate cake, and then a chocolate pie, and then we went on to two blueberry pies before the week was out. It was a great week!

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Farm Videos

Using sweet potato vines as winter soil cover

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

 

Harvesting hemp for our salve – you can buy it for $10/jar

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

 

Making apple cider

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

 

Book Review

Solito: A Memoir, by Javier Zamora, is, in my opinion, a must read. Javier the 9-year-old narrates his 7-week experience of attempting to get from El Salvador to California in 1999. He actually wrote the book in 2021-22 at age 32. We have a 9-year-old grandson, so it really came home to me as I look at Doodle and imagine him making such a trek without any family members. Javier does a remarkable job of giving us a bird’s eye view of this life-changing event while never losing the perspective of the young child. If you ever think about the topic of migration of people from Central America and Mexico to the US (“la usa”, according to the boy Javier), this will give you a very intimate view of the danger, the discomfort and physical strain, the fear, and the brilliant moments of connection between the travelers. This excellent book is life-enhancing for the reader. I recommend it highly.

CSA Updates This Week

CSA Crops This Week

We have three more weeks left for the CSA with our last week being October 24, 26 and 28.

  • Parsley
  • Chard
  • Tulsi
  • Carrots for larges and radishes for mediums and smalls
  • Dill
  • Fennel
  • Brussels sprouts – not happy with this crop this year – let’s see what we get
  • Kale
  • Cilantro
  • Hakurei turnips
  • Carnival or delicata winter squash
  • Sweet potatoes – please be advised that your sweet potatoes, and to some extent beets, might have some mouse damage. We have some very healthy mice and voles in our fields. Just cut off the bite marks if they concern you, or just scrub them clean before preparing. Fall is mouse time!
  • Arugula

The first hard frost came almost like clockwork on the morning of October 9, right when it almost always shows up. The only thing that we will have to take off the list this week is tulsi. Otherwise, all the galinsoga and pigweed bit the dust, which is a blessing.

Fall CSA Share

We still have room!

We can take up to 100 fall shares, so there is still room. We will be picking on Mondays for Gardner, Athol, Princeton, Holden and Barre. Wednesday pick up for Barre, Sutton, Worcester and Shrewsbury. Our start is on October 31. For the last week, all pick-ups will be on Monday, November 21.

You can join here – https://mhof.net/csa-share-options/.

MHOF Meat

Meat birds available for sale

The chickens are now in the freezer, so call or email to come buy some – https://mhof.net/organic-meat/.

Now is a good time to order your Thanksgiving turkey

They are going fast! The birds are out there growing like weeds on our luscious pasture, certified organic feed and a regular treat of comfrey. Our turkeys are renowned as the tastiest and juiciest birds that will ever grace your Thanksgiving table. Birds are slaughtered the Monday before Thanksgiving (November 21) and are available for pick up on Tuesday the 22nd and Wednesday the 23rd.

 

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

Buy MHOF Meat

 

Working Shareholders Always Welcome

Yes, you can still add yourself to the MHOF workforce. Come any M, W or F from 8-12 and stay for lunch. We always have a great time.

Volunteer at MHOF

Farm Doin’s

It was an exciting weekend last weekend as the folks came to dig a long trench to the house from our new generator location at the bottom of the driveway, and install it. Not yet hooked up, but we hope to be ready for the next power outage.

I was struck by how beautiful our flower boxes were on October 1. This picture is now my screen saver on my computer to help me remember the brilliance of healthy flowers when we are deep into winter.

Monday, we had a visit from Renee, a friend from UMass and she helped us finish the sweet potato harvest. Monday also was a special day because we met a new Stetson student, Asher, and Kamarin was back for the first time since he left us in August. These folks and Gary helped Jonathan organize our lumber shelves that are attached to the barn.

We picked away at our hoop house planting, finishing up the planting of the orange house to lettuce, and we did the big turn over of the yellow house from melons to lettuce beds, but ran out of time to plant. Meanwhile we are on a forced feeding diet of melons, eating them in the field off the back of the truck, and stuffing our faces at breakfast, lunch and supper also.

Thursday was consumed with the final product of 88 quarts of apple juice. Canning wasn’t completed until Friday morning!

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

And we sandwiched in 3 crates of chard for freezing

Friday afternoon Pete and I chilled out and picked the hemp, and got more chilled out as we worked…It is in the dryer this weekend and is still chilling us out.

Jonathan and John picked away at the garage, finishing the south side and moving on to the front. And Jack and Jonathan put together a plan for all of our outside buildings and how to most efficiently organize them. Speaking of cleaning up and organizing, this work thrills me to no end. Perhaps it is the ¼ German blood that I have flowing in my veins.

We only had enough flowers for Monday and Wednesday shares, but don’t they look pretty!

Keep your eyes wide open this week, and drink in the beautiful leaves of our blessed New England landscape.

Photo credit: Alexandre Chiacchio

Julie

Quick Links

Buy CSA
Buy meat
CSA pick up information
Contact Julie
Products available right now at the farm
Become a working shareholder

Cleaning

Cleaning

I am not sure if this is just a “girl” thing, but I get the extreme urge to clean up the house, the barns, the farm, etc. in the fall. But then, precisely because I am a woman who came of age when the 1960’s – 70’s version of women’s liberation was peaking (I see that time period as another manifestation of one of many previous iterations of women’s quest for equality), I focused on ubiquitous “he” language, being someone’s Mrs. So and so, and thinking about having a profession alongside being a wife and mother.

The clincher for Jack’s and my relationship, the one which has been fraught with challenge from the start, however, was around washing dishes, cleaning house, and general day to day keeping things in order and tidied up. When I was growing up, that was all the purview of the wife and mother, period. I think because I grew up with that consciousness and then became part of a movement as a young woman that encouraged more sharing of these daily tasks, I have always had a schizophrenic relationship with house cleaning. Two years ago, when I retired from NOFA, I had an inspiration to really clean up the house, organize, throw stuff out, and better organize our living space as we have moved from parents of 4 children to living here by ourselves. But here I am two years hence and haven’t made much progress in the feng shui of our daily living space.

The whole situation here is more complex because our house is also an extension of our farm with hundreds of people passing through it in any one year. I am finally ready to make it happen this year, however, and to move forward with Jack in our relationship on how to organize and clean our space in a way that works for both of us. I look forward to integrating my upbringing with my adult politics over these next fall and winter months. I look forward to cleaning out this physic closet – it is well overdue.

Health Stuff

7 Day Autumn Whole Foods Cleanse

Are you experiencing any of the following?

– Excess weight around your belly
– Sugar or salt cravings on a regular basis
– Skin blemishes and breakouts
– Can’t think straight or feel like you have brain fog
– Getting a late afternoon energy slump
– Waking up still feeling tired

If so, it might be time for a gentle whole foods detox!

I’m excited to be bringing my many years of experience supporting 1,000’s of clients through food-based Cleanses, to this Autumn’s experience! You are guaranteed to walk away lighter in mind, body and spirit.

The 7-Day Autumn Cleanse is perfect for you if:

+ You’ve never detoxed before
+ You’re really busy and don’t have time for a longer detox program
+ You want a gentle but effective detox
+ You’re looking for a whole foods detox program
+ You want to clean out your system before the holidays hit
+ You’re ready to hit the re-set button on your eating habits
+ You’re an experienced Cleanser looking for a reset and to go deep (there are extra materials I’ve created to take this Cleanse deeper if you wish)

Join me to see how 7 days of clean eating can make all the difference! Early Bird Discount is good thru today (October 3rd)! https://ellenkittredge.com/7-day-cleanse.php

Ellen

Ari Whitten Interviews Donna Gates This Week

One of the earliest leaders in the fermented food world. This in an excellent listen.

My Personal Health Journey

“Those that are flexible are disciples of life. ” — Lao Tzu

I have been thinking about taking up qi gong for at least two decades, but never gotten started on it. With so much available on the internet, it is easy to sample any number of exercise and self-healing modalities. I ran into Master Lee Holden and his 7 minutes per day qi gong exercises. You can look him up here – https://www.holdenqigong.com/. I am sure that many of our subscribers have been practicing qi gong and can probably share numerous practitioners. Practicing for just one week, I have been humbled by all the places in my body that hurt! I look forward to enjoying the benefits of qi gong as I stick with this for the longer term.

CSA Updates This Week

CSA Crops This Week

We have four more weeks left for the CSA with our last week being October 24, 26 and 28.

  • Beets
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Lettuce and peppers for larges
  • Hakurei turnips for some
  • Radishes
  • Dill

Dill

  • Parsley

Parsley

  • Garlic
  • Tulsi

Tulsi

  • Carnival or delicata winter squash

Carnival squash

  • Sweet potatoes – please be advised that your sweet potatoes, and to some extent beets, might have some mouse damage. We have some very healthy mice and voles in our fields. Just cut off the bite marks if they concern you, or just scrub them clean before preparing. Fall is mouse time!
  • Arugula
  • We might send some flowers home with you this week

We dodged frost this past week and are looking at some touchy lows again this week. Hopefully we can keep lots of crops coming without too much damage. Regardless, grow back is slower now, so quantities are thinning out in the fields.

Fall CSA Share

Sign Up Now!

We have counted up our fall shares and we are at 58. We can take up to 100 fall shares, so there is still room. We will be picking on Mondays and Wednesdays and will determine delivery days of the week as we get closer to our start on October 31. You can join here.

Reserve a Fall Share

Meat birds available for sale

The chickens are now in the freezer, so call or email to come buy some.

Buy MHOF Meat

Now is a good time to order your Thanksgiving turkey

We only have 45 left available for pre-order. The kids are out there growing like weeds on our luscious pasture, certified organic feed and a regular treat of comfrey. Our turkeys are renowned as the tastiest and juiciest birds that will ever grace your Thanksgiving table. Birds are slaughtered the Monday before Thanksgiving (November 21) and are available for pick up on Tuesday the 22nd and Wednesday the 23rd.

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Buy MHOF Meat

Working Shareholders Always Welcome

Yes, you can still add yourself to the MHOF workforce. Come any M, W or F from 8-12 and stay for lunch. We always have a great time.

Volunteer at MHOF

Farm Doin’s

We started the farm week early last week. On Sunday Dan and the boys and I moved the pigs to a new pasture area with their favorite woods as part of it. Then we picked up 5 truck loads of wood chips from our neighbor Matt. The chips are highly valued here as mulch.

“Oh, do you have something for us?”

Dan and Raffi unloading chips

Skippy’s favorite job is to bark at the pigs as we move them in their house to their next location

This week felt like such a good one for fall accomplishments. We collected and sent off our soil tests, dried two large batches of tulsi and made two more ½ gallons of tincture (I was a bit embarrassed to dump three large empty vodka bottles into the recycling bin at the dump!).

We finished up our winter squash harvest (937!),

Hucking squash out of the tractor bucket into the second floor of the barn

prepared for and received a new freezer for the 2nd floor of the barn (two of our freezers bit the dust this past year), Jonathan tractor flattened the field areas that the pigs tore up and planted it to rye and then went on to mow and rake our hay in the pond field, which we collected on Friday afternoon. We will use the hay for garlic mulch and also chicken bedding all winter.

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Four nice loads of hay

Cathleen came over and helped us make our first batch of cider for the year.

Clare shaking the apple tree

We started sweet potato harvest – 5 rows of our 18 down. It is a good harvest, although the mice have been enjoying them also.

Thursday, we prepped half of the orange house and the blue house and got the blue house planted with Asian greens for the fall share.

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Blue house all planted

Friday night some locals dug into one of our chicken houses and one of our turkey houses and killed a chicken and maimed a turkey. Looks like Skippy and Dingo will have to do some night patrolling again. Lots of hungry wild animals out there right now.

We found Sadie’s kittens in the attic of the toolshed

Laurie ecstatic in the cilantro patch

Jonathan, Stu and John almost finished the south side of the garage this week. And as I write this, we are getting the trench dug and filled with the conduit for a generator that Jack has shepherded the installation of over the past several months.

Julie

Quick Links

Buy CSA
Buy meat
CSA pick up information
Contact Julie
Products available right now at the farm
Become a working shareholder

The Community Meal

As it turns out, I spend more than 10 hours per day either growing food and caring for its stewardship, preparing it to eat or put by, cleaning up after its preparation and serving, or thinking and studying and discussing with others how to do all of this better. And I am not even Italian! Our running tally for meals served here this year is presently at 3,473. You can place your bets here for the total as of December 31 and the winner will receive your favorite bar of soap or bottle of tincture as a prize, and a free coupon for one of our farm lunches redeemable in 2023. Place your bets by October 31.

Silliness aside, I got invited to a zoom the other day that was to take place at noon on a week day. Sacrilege, I thought. When Jack and I got together, one of my bottom lines was that we eat our meals together. And that has become a strong tradition here. Why is this so important to me? Maybe it is the midwestern farm upbringing, maybe it is what I have read about the power of eating and communing that has been so historically significant for so many centuries. Or maybe it is just what I have come to learn in my own experience that when people eat together, they become closer, they share what becomes a sacred gift, and they all walk away with a satisfaction that pervades the spirit. We have had many great meals this past week, but I think most fondly on Scott’s birthday party on Thursday. After a very productive morning of food preservation and avoidance of outside work in the pouring rain, we celebrated his 64th with a roast chicken and potatoes, two kinds of melon, the last of the corn, a monster zucchini, full salad, and Clare’s birthday chocolate pudding. We have miracles happening around us all the time. Here is my challenge to you to make the miracle of a shared meal your reality three times per day.

Scott’s birthday party complete with roast chicken, potatoes, salad, sweet corn, summer squash and Clare’s chocolate pudding

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Personal Wellness

Tulsi, Tulsi, Tulsi

Everybody is talking about it, and we are consuming it in tea and making tincture. We have the most beautiful patch of it this year, and thus, the CSA members are getting it each week. Check out this great article from Beth Callahan. Thanks, Beth!

7 Ways To Use Tulsi Everyday – Herbal Academy

I saw this article and thought of you.
https://theherbalacademy.com/use-tulsi-everyday/

Hi Julie,

I wanted to share that fresh tulsi tea is my new found love too with many thanks to you.  I recently went back to school for my Ayurveda Herbalist Certification.  So I’m all about herbs.  I thought I would share with you some other wonderful properties that tulsi is recognized for beyond its calming effect on the nervous system.  It is great for clearing mucus from the lungs or respiratory tract and used to treat fevers and flu.  Additionally, it is useful in asthma, bronchitis, and rhinitis.  It can increase lung capacity and reduce labored breathing.  It could be helpful with COVID (there’s no research on this, but something to think about).  But there’s more!!  It is a heating herb that is dry and light.  It is good for the digestive system.  It helps to move things through the intestines and calms a fermented digestive tract. It increases the appetite and is a warming stimulant for digestion.  It can aid in weight loss, reduce blood sugar levels, and cholesterol.  It has an affinity for the heart, increasing circulation and blood flow.  For people with a hot constitution (pitta), it could aggravate in excess. For people with a dry constitution (vata), I might suggest a pinch of licorice root to balance out the drying quality.  Of course everything in moderation is key.

Thank you as always for the amazing bounty.

Love,

Jennifer

Wow this is great, Jennifer. Thanks for rounding out more information on tulsi. I have been adding it to tea for about a month now, with green tea, chaga and wood betany, and enjoying a quart of it throughout the day. 

Love, Julie

Videos from MHOF this week

Tincture Production

Clare produced two tincture videos this week

Making tulsi tincture

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Bottling yellow dock, dandelion and Japanese knotweed root tinctures

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

CSA Updates This Week

CSA Crops This Week

  • Beets
  • Chard
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Peppers for some
  • Cilantro
  • Parsley
  • Tulsi
  • Tomatoes – though our plants are still very healthy, healthier than they have ever been this long into the season, the temperature has dropped and the light just isn’t there. So, we have some, and you might get ones that aren’t quite ripe. Just let them sit on your counter, not in your fridge, and they will ripen up
  • Squash – Clare and I were able to harvest 256 of them on Friday before we ran out of time. There are hundreds more. Look for a delicata or a carnival (looks like an acorn squash) in your bag. There might be a handful of summer squashes too, but they are almost gone
  • Arugula
  • Celery again – as it has gotten so large, we might cut some in half so they fit in the bags
  • Sage
  • You pick flowers in the back of the south field for local shareholders. Enquire at pick up!

More MHOF News

Yes, we have kittens!

Eloise has done it again. And even though I told her she had to raise them outside this time, she pressed, and we relented. Arguably the cutest kittens we have ever raised, these good-looking cats will be available for sale on Friday, October 7 – 4-6 pm and Saturday, October 8 – 1-4 pm. $50, first come, first served. Contact me to put in your reservation. Email me at julie@mhof.net. Do not reach out on Facebook as I will not respond there.

Unfortunate news regarding our pigs’ eating history

This past Wednesday our organic certification inspector came for his yearly inspection. When we were walking past the pigs, he noted that our supplier of certified organic pigs had recently dropped certification (unbeknownst to us). What this means is that we can not claim them to be certified organic, as she fed the piglets non-GMO, but not certified organic, feed. We, of course, are feeding them certified organic grains from Green Mountain Feeds, moving their pasture each week, and giving them tons of our food processing waste by the time they go to slaughter. So, I feel there is not a better pork product around. You can pre-order pork on the website.

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Buy MHOF Meat

Videos From the Outside World

Optimizing your gut health with Kiran Krishnan

This guy is really sharp. One of my favorites. Listen carefully to this completely information packed podcast. Enjoy!

Other News

Soil and Nutrition Conference

Son Dan is the ED of the Bionutrient Food Association and their annual conference, back in person after two years, will be held on the weekend of December 3 and 4 at the Sturbridge Host Hotel. It is always an opportunity to stretch your mind and meet interesting folks.

https://bionutrient.org/snc

Ellen’s Latest Offering

Wisdom of the Body, Wisdom of Nature Begins October 9th!

All details here: http://www.lecoeurasheville.com/new-events

In this Course we learn to align ourselves with energies from nature that are part of our birthright and that can offer remarkable transformation in all areas of life. Scholarships are available for those in need, so please just ask. https://youtu.be/cfpWME-Qlcc

“The connections developed during this course have brought forth a different sense of capacity – a fullness and deeper sense of wholeness. A love like no other. I couldn’t wait to be together with everyone each week.” – Stephanie Clement

Fall CSA Share

Sign Up Now!

We are setting aside some of our storage crops like potatoes, onions, garlic, and taking good care of our late greens and roots, all with the hope to have a bounteous fall share. It is always a bit of a Russian roulette game with the weather, but we are planning ahead for a healthy selection for you.

Reserve a fall share

Meat birds available for sale

The chickens are now in the freezer, so call or email to come buy some.

Watch this promo movie we put together this week!

Watch video on Facebook
Watch video on Instagram

Buy MHOF Meat

Working Shareholders Always Welcome

This past week Melissa joined us. Melissa is a music friend and I am so happy she has decided to work with us. The work is always more bounteous than we have hands for. Join us.

Melissa

Volunteer at MHOF

Farm Doin’s

Each week now is a hustle to get as much of the crops harvested that are one and done (soybeans, corn, potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc.) and then stored for the CSA and/or processed for the farm food system for the next 12 months. This week we finally finished the potato harvest. We have been enjoying the mouse eaten potatoes almost every day, while the others are safely in the root cellar for distribution.

We harvested all the corn (I always felt that I was going into a war zone when I picked it this fall) and froze it for later consumption. Next year we hope to be back handing out this wonderful corn to the CSA. On the home front we froze the left-over soybeans, particularly for our Thanksgiving feast. We also cleaned up the most recent cabbage bed after harvest and froze the split heads.

Thursday’s complete wash out allowed us to make 75 quarts of applesauce, shell our saved pea seed, bring our tinctures up to date, cut and sort our onions, and do some remodeling in the barn. Jonathan and John got some garage time in and we ended the day on Friday meeting with our consultants from Advancing EcoAgriculture. Time to start planning for next year!

Our poor crops looked a little worse for wear on Friday after Thursday’s long and intense rains and then cold and stiff winds the next day. They have all represented so well for us this year.

Clare and Pete working on soybeans, chard and cabbage preservation

While Jonathan processed our dried Chicken of the woods

Jack had to take a picture of me with one of our monster watermelons

As it turns out, we do our best gossiping while in the bean patch. We are at close quarters for an extended period of time. Now that the beans are done for the year, we are going to have to find another gossip station.

Shelling our pea seed that will be our pea crop for next year

At our height, there were four of us processing applesauce on Thursday

Stu supervising while Clare, Scott, Alex and Paula assiduously cut onions

Looks like we might squeak through without a frost again this week – fingers crossed. On the docket – soil tests, more cover-cropping, planting some lettuce and greens in the hoop houses, squash harvest, sweet potato harvest.

Julie

Quick Links

Buy CSA
Buy meat
CSA pick up information
Contact Julie
Products available right now at the farm
Become a working shareholder